During Leave

Maternity, Parental and Adoptive Leave

Leave (with the exception of maternity leave) is unpaid leave. However, residents may qualify for EI during this time. What you can expect to earn while on leave will depend on your income (and thus PGY level) and whether you choose to work part-time (moonlight, etc) or have other income sources. Birth Mothers are entitled to 52 weeks consecutive leave (the first 17 weeks of which are paid at 85%), whereas fathers and adoptive parents are entitled 35 weeks of unpaid leave.

It is important to note any time taken off your residency must be made up. Maternity and/or parental leave will extend your residency.
  • Maternity Leave

    EI Maternity Benefits

    Maternity EI benefits are payable to the birth mother for a maximum of fifteen (15) weeks.

    To receive maternity benefits you are required to have worked for 600 hours in the last fifty- two (52) weeks or since your last claim. You need to prove your pregnancy by signing a statement declaring the expected or actual birth date. The basic benefit rate is 55% of your salary (although the maximum salary is $49,000 and all full time residents will pass this cut off). In other words, given that residents are “maxed out,” you can receive a maximum payment of $524 per week from EI.

    Birth mothers can start collecting EI maternity benefits up to eight (8) weeks before the expected due date, but must apply for EI no later than the week of the birth. Maternity benefits cannot be collected past seventeen (17) weeks following the actual or expected birth (whichever is later). Please note that the date you file your claim is very important in order for you to receive the maximum maternity benefits to which you are entitled. If the actual date of birth is different from the expected date, it is very important that you inform EI as soon as possible after your child’s birth. Contact Service Canada at 1-800-206-7218, or you can go in person to your local Service Canada Centre.

    If your baby is hospitalized, then the seventeen (17) week limit to collect benefits can be extended for every week your child is in the hospital, up to a maximum of 52 weeks following the week of the child’s birth. You will still only receive benefits for a maximum of 15 weeks, but payments can be delayed until your child comes home. However, if you received maternity benefits prior to the birth and wanted to receive the remaining benefits when your child comes home, contact Service Canada to have the necessary adjustment done to your claim.

    The weekly EI payment and the number of weeks to be paid remain the same even if you give birth to more than one child at the same time.

    Collective Agreement Benefits: Maternity Leave

    Resident mothers are entitled to a total of fifty-two (52) consecutive weeks (17 weeks maternity plus 35 weeks parental) leave of absence without pay. Through the Supplement Employment Benefits (SEB) Plan, the Employer will pay 85% of your salary during the first two (2) weeks of leave (the EI waiting period), and then top up the amount you receive from EI, or any other earnings, to a maximum of 85% of your salary.

    Example: For an R1 with a base salary of $50,433.85, for weeks one and two, the employer pays 85% of the base salary ($824.40). In weeks three (3) to seventeen (17) she would receive $524 from EI, plus the Employer top up of $300.40 for a total of $824.40 per week (85% of the regular weekly earnings).

    Residents may start maternity leave up to eleven (11) weeks prior to the week of expected delivery, but no later than the actual birth date, and must make every effort to give four (4) weeks notice prior to the start of leave. For the duration of maternity leave, all extended medical and dental benefits continue as if the resident were not absent.

    Vacation Entitlement

    Residents who take maternity or parental leave also have their vacation leave prorated using the following formula:

    (Days paid to June 30th inclusive/261)*20

  • Parental and Adoptive Leave

    EI Parental Benefits

    Parental EI benefits are payable to the mother, father or adoptive parent for a maximum of thirty-five (35) weeks. These weeks are shared, i.e. one parent takes 10 weeks, the other takes 25 weeks for a total of 35 weeks. There is a two (2) week waiting period, but this only needs to be served by one person. If you or your partner have completed the waiting period for maternity benefits, it does not need to be repeated.

    For adoptive parents, one parent will need to complete the two (2) week waiting period, but not both.

    To receive parental benefits you are required to have worked for 600 hours in the last fifty-two (52) weeks or since your last claim. You need sign a statement declaring the date of birth or adoption. Benefit payments must be completed with fifty-two (52) weeks of the child’s birth or adoption placement.

    The basic benefit rate is 55% of your salary (although the maximum salary is $49,000 and all full time residents will pass this cut off). In other words, given that residents are “maxed out,” you can receive a maximum payment of $524 per week from EI. The weekly EI benefit remains the same even if you have or adopt more than one child at the same time.

    If your child is hospitalized, then the fifty-two (52) week limit to collect benefits can be extended for every week your child is in the hospital, up to 52 weeks following the birth date. You will still receive benefits for a maximum of thirty-five (35) weeks, but payments can be delayed until your child comes home.

    Collective Agreement Benefits: Birth Mothers

    Parental leave for birth mothers in the Collective Agreement is thirty-five (35) weeks (this is in addition to seventeen (17) weeks maternity leave). During this time extended medical and dental benefits continue as if the resident is not absent.

    Birth mothers are entitled to up to six (6) additional consecutive weeks of leave if a medical practitioner certifies that she is unable to return to work when her leave ends due to reasons related to birth or termination of pregnancy.

    If there are special circumstances, an additional five (5) consecutive weeks of leave without pay is available if a medical practitioner certifies that an additional period of parental care is required because the child suffers from a physical, psychological or emotional condition. This leave must begin immediately following the fifty-two (52) weeks (combined maternity and paternity) leave.

    The maximum combined entitlement to leave for birth mothers is sixty-three (63) weeks.

    Collective Agreement Benefits: Fathers & Adoptive Parents

    Parental leave for fathers and adoptive parents in the Collective Agreement is thirty-seven (37) weeks. During this time extended medical and dental benefits continue as if the resident is not absent.

    Residents also receive two (2) paid days off to attend the birth of their child. To increase the amount of time you can take off to attend the birth, you can also use your two (2) paid flex days, or take vacation.

    If there are special circumstances, an additional five (5) consecutive weeks of leave without pay is available if a medical practitioner certifies that an additional period of parental care is required because the child suffers from a physical, psychological or emotional condition. This leave must begin immediately following the thirty-seven (37) weeks leave. Any additional leave beyond this will be without pay or benefits.

    Working While On Parental Leave

    As a general rule, if you work while receiving EI Parental Benefits, you can earn up to $131 (25% of your maximum weekly benefit) without affecting your EI payments.

    However there is currently a pilot project in place (in effect until August 1, 2015) that works as follows:

    • If you earn 90% or less of your regular pre-leave weekly earnings, your benefits are reduced by 50% of the amount you earn.
    • If your earnings exceed 90% of your regular pre-leave weekly earnings, the your EI benefit is reduced dollar-for-dollar.

    Example: A R1 resident on paternity leave earns $800 a week while receiving EI benefits. EI therefore reduces the benefit amount by $400, paying the resident $114 per week, while the resident keeps the $800 dollars they earned. If the same resident were to earn $1000 a week while receiving parental benefits, the amount is reduced dollar for dollar by EI, thereby paying the resident $0, while the resident keeps the $1000 they earned.

    Vacation Entitlement

    Residents who take maternity or parental leave also have their vacation leave prorated using the following formula:

    (Days paid to June 30th inclusive/261)*20

    Example: A resident intends to starts their leave on April 16th and intends to return in the new appointment period.
    Their vacation for the current term of appointment is prorated to 16 days. Their vacation entitlement in the new appointment period would also be prorated based on the number of days delayed from the July 1st start date.

  • Summary
    Parental Leave – Birth Mothers Leave Income Benefits
    Resident Doctors of BC 35 weeks $0 Continue as if the resident is not absent. Contact payroll to arrange payment of your portion while you are leave
    EI 35 weeks (access to this leave is shared with your partner if applicable) $524* (See note about working while on parental leave) none
    Total 35 weeks $524/week Same as during residency, contact payroll to arrange payment

     

    Parental Leave – Fathers, Adoptive Parents Leave Income Benefits
    Resident Doctors of BC 37 weeks, plus 2 days to attend the birth of the child $0 Continue as if the resident is not absent. Contact payroll to arrange payment of your portion while you are leave
    EI up to 35 weeks (access to this leave is shared with your partner if applicable), only one parent must serve the 2 week EI waiting period, so if your partner already fulfilled that during maternity leave, you do not need to repeat it $524* (See note about working while on parental leave) none
    Total 37 weeks $524/week for up to 35 weeks Same as during residency, contact payroll to arrange payment

    *Note* Working while on Parental Leave

    If you work while receiving EI Parental Benefits you can earn up to $50 per week, or 25% of your weekly benefit ($131) whichever is higher

    However there is currently a pilot project in place (August 5 2012 – August 1 2015) that works as follows:

    • If you earn less than 90% of your normal weekly earnings, your benefits are reduced by a rate of 50% of your earnings
    • If your earnings exceed 90% of your normal weekly earnings, the amount is deducted dollar for dollar.

    Example:

    A R1 resident on paternity leave earns $800 a week while receiving parental benefits, EI will therefore reduce the benefit amount by $400 dollars, paying the resident 114 per week, while the resident keeps the $800 dollars they earned.

    If the same resident were to earn $1000 a week while receiving parental benefits, the amount is reduced dollar for dollar by EI, paying the resident $0, while the resident keeps the $1000 they earned.

Paperwork

  • EI & Beyond

    Getting your paperwork in order for Leave, Employment Insurance, and your SEB top-up (if applicable) can take a lot of time and organization. Here is a summary:

    1. Talk to your program administrator once you have announced your pregnancy, or know when you intend to take leave if adopting or have an expecting partner (four weeks notice is required for natural fathers). They should let you know what steps you need to take; many will do this on your behalf. In general, payroll services need to know your expected delivery date so they can plan for your maternity/parental benefits. You will want to update them once you officially start your leave as the expected delivery date is rarely the birth date.
    2. Apply for EI Benefits. Apply for EI as soon as you stop working, expectant mothers can start collecting EI up to eight (8) weeks before their expected delivery date. Delaying filing for your benefits past four (4) weeks from the start of your leave may cause a loss of benefits.

    The application will take approximately 60 minutes to complete, and you will need the following personal information:

    • Social Insurance Number (SIN) – If your SIN begins with a 9 you will need to provide proof of your immigration status and work permit
    • The SIN and name of the other parent
    • Your mother’s maiden name
    • The expected or actual date of birth
    • Your mailing and residential addresses, including postal codes
    • Your complete banking information, including your branch number, institutional name and number, and your account number (as shown on your cheques or bank statements) if you want to have your payments directly deposited

    You will also need the following employment information:

    • The names, addresses and telephone numbers of all employers you have worked for in the last 52 weeks, as well as the dates of employment and the reasons for separating from these employers
    • Your detailed version of the facts if you quit or were dismissed from any job in the last 52 weeks
    • If your earnings varied over the last year, you will need to provide dates (Sunday – Saturday) and earnings for each of your highest paid weeks of insurable earnings in the last 52 weeks or since the start of your last EI claim, whichever is the shorter period. This information will be used, along with your Record(s) of Employment, to calculate your weekly EI benefit rate
    • Record(s) of Employment from the last fifty-two (52) weeks
    1. File newborn paperwork (when your child arrives)
      1. In BC we can use the Newborn Registration Service to take care of several things at once:
        • Complete the registration of your baby’s birth with vital statistics
        • Apply for their birth certificate
        • Apply for a SIN for your baby
        • Register them for MSP coverage.
        1. You will also need to let Health Shared Services HSSBC know of your new baby so they can add your new dependent to your coverage. This can come in handy early on if your child is admitted for neonatal jaundice or other health concerns. You can contact them at 604-283-8683
        2. There are also benefits some residents will be eligible for from the government, birth mothers in BC can apply for them by allowing the BC Vital Statistics Agency to share their newborn registration with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) or you can apply directly though the CRA:
        1. The Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) is a tax-free monthly payment made to eligible families to help them with the cost of raising children under age 18. You should apply for the CCTB as soon as possible after your child is born. To be eligible:
        • You must live with the child, and the child must be under 18
        • You must be primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of the child
        • you must be a resident of Canada
        • You or your spouse must be a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident who has lived in Canada for the previous 18 months, and who has a valid permit in the 19th month

    If you are receiving the CCTB you will automatically receive the Universal Child Care Benefit

      1. The Universal Child Care Benefit program issues a taxable $100 monthly payment to families for each child under the age of six to help cover the cost of child care.
      2. Finally, there are financial savings plans to register for as well. Don’t put this off as the government will match or top up your contributions, depending on your income level, in some of the programs.
  • Child Tax Credit

    The Canada Revenue Agency has benefit programs available for individuals with children.

    The Canada Child Tax Credit:

    The Canada Child Tax Credit is a monthly benefit designed which supplements your income to help with the cost of raising your child or children. To be eligible to receive the credit, you must meet the following criteria:

    • you must live with a child under the age of 18;
    • be the primary caretaker and responsible for this child; and
    • you must be a resident of Canada and be either a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident for the last 18 months with a valid permit for the 19th month.

    Your benefit is calculated based on your income level and the number of children you have. The Canada Revenue Agency publishes a table for each tax year denoting the monthly benefit:

    To estimate your benefits use the CCTB calculator.

    You can apply for the CCTC using the Automated Benefits Application.

    For more information on the credit, please visit the Canada Revenue Agency CCTC page.

    The Universal Child Care Benefit:

    The Universal Child Care Benefit is designed to help families and individuals with the costs associated with providing child care. Unlike the CCTC, the UCCB is only applicable for families or individuals with children under the age of 6.

    To be eligible to receive the credit, you must meet the following criteria: you must live with a child under 6 years of age; be the primary caretaker and responsible for this child; and you must be a resident of Canada and be either a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident for the last 18 months with a valid permit for the 19th month. Whether you intend to have your child placed in daycare or not, you may still receive the UCCB. Because the benefit is only applicable to families or individuals with children under the age of 6, the Canada Revenue Agency advises that as soon as the child is born, he or she should be registered for the benefit. To apply for the benefit, visit the Application page. For more information on the benefit, please see the Canada Revenue Agency UCCB page.

    Please see the Canada Revenue Agency’s Benefits page for complete details on the above programs.